Ebike Regulations

Electric Bike Regulations by State in 2022


Learning how to ride your e-bike is a fun experience. But knowing where you can ride your e-bike is important too! That’s why we’ve compiled this list of the latest state laws for e-bike use in the United States. Use this handy guide to check e-bike laws in your state or states you are planning to visit this summer!

 

As with all regulation guidance, this information is as accurate as possible at the time of publishing. Please respect the e-bike community’s reputation and check with your local park or city laws for the latest update on e-bike classes and usage. 

 

Alabama

Alabama regulates e-bikes like traditional bicycles in terms of road laws and usage. However, class 3 e-bikes require the rider to be at least 16 years of age and to wear a helmet. Some local cities have restricted the use of e-bikes on specific trails, but e-bikes are generally allowed wherever traditional bikes are. 

 

Alaska

Alaska requires riders of e-bikes to carry an operator’s license but does not require insurance or registration. E-bikes are considered motor-driven and do not follow the same laws as traditional bicycles, therefore, if you are considering riding in Alaska, consult your local laws for more guidance. Riders of all e-bikes must be at least 14 years old. 

 

Arizona

Like many states, Arizona regulates e-bikes like traditional bicycles in terms of road laws and usage. There is no minimum age to ride an e-bike and helmets are not required by law. On Arizona state land, the trail must be considered “motorized” for e-bikes to be allowed on it.

 

Arkansas

Arkansas regulates e-bikes like traditional bicycles in terms of road laws and usage. However, class 3 e-bikes require the rider to be at least 16 years of age and to wear a helmet if they are under 21 years of age. Arkansas State and Local laws do not further define regulations for e-bikes so check with the park or parks you plan to visit. 

 

California

Riding in California is great for those that enjoy the sun and heat. California regulates e-bikes just like traditional bikes, however, helmets are required on Class 3 e-bikes and Class 3 e-bikes require the rider to be at least 16. Class 1 and 2 e-bikes are allowed on almost every bike path and bike lane in California. 

 

Colorado

Colorado regulates e-bikes like traditional bicycles in terms of road laws and usage. However, class 3 e-bikes require the rider to be at least 16 years of age and to wear a helmet if they are under 21. Colorado State Parks are e-bike friendly because e-bikes are currently allowed wherever traditional bikes are allowed. 

 

Connecticut

Class 3 e-bikes are the most limited in Connecticut because they are not permitted on bike trails or multi-use trails. Keep an eye out for signs that prohibit motorized vehicles. Class 1 e-bikes are allowed on most bike paths provided the rider is wearing a helmet and the bike has operable pedals (a requirement of all class 1 e-bikes).

 

Delaware

E-bikes like Himiway E-bikes are defined as bicycles in Delaware because they have a 750W motor and can be configured to stop providing power above 20mph. Helmets are required for anyone under 18 on e-bikes. Any trail which allows motorized and non-motorized vehicles is open to e-bikes in Delaware at this time. 

 

Florida

All classes of e-bikes may be used anywhere traditional bikes are used in Florida. All riders of e-bikes must be 16 and wear a helmet. Some cities have restricted the use of e-bikes but typically allow Class 1 and 2 e-bikes even if Class 3 are restricted. This is good news because Himiway e-bikes are shipped as Class 2 e-bikes. 

 

Georgia

Georgia limits the use of Class 3 e-bikes mostly. The limits are that the riders must be at least 15 years old and wear a helmet. They may only be ridden on specific paths, such as those adjacent to highways or roadways. DO NOT ever take your e-bike onto the highway though. The Department of Natural Resources in Georgia does not have an official policy on e-bikes as of May 2022 so State land follows traditional bike laws unless otherwise stated. 

 

Hawaii

Hawaii is rather strict when it comes to electric bike laws. Hawaii considers e-bikes s mopeds and requires riders to wear helmets if they are 17 or younger. E-bikes must be registered and the rider must have a driver's license or other operator’s license. 

 

Idaho

Class 3 e-bikes are prohibited on non-motorized trails and in Idaho State Parks. Class 1 and 2 e-bikes are allowed on State Park trails and most city bike paths. There is no age limit, but helmets must be worn by riders 17 and younger. Idaho does not require licensing or registration of the e-bike. Riders must ride as far to the right as possible on roads, as with traditional bikes. 

 

Illinois

E-bikes are governed by the same laws as traditional bikes in Illinois. You may not ride them on sidewalks, and they are defined as “low-speed electric bicycles” which follow the same 1 through 3 Class system as most states. There are prohibitions on Class 3 e-bikes for anyone under 16.  

 

Indiana

Indiana regulates e-bikes like traditional bicycles in terms of road laws and usage. However, class 3 e-bikes require the rider to be at least 15 years of age and to wear a helmet if they are under 18, even if they are just a passenger. Note: e-bikes are not allowed on State mountain bike trails in Indiana. 

 

Iowa

Iowa is rather easy-going when it comes to e-bikes and considers any e-bike the same as a traditional bike as long as the motor is under 750 watts and the max speed is 20mph. Even if there is no speed limit posted, riders may not go faster than 20mph on any e-bike. E-bikes can use motorized trails throughout the state. 

 

Kansas

Kansas does not require any permits, registrations, or insurance on e-bikes, similar to other states. However, riders under 16 may not operate class 3 e-bikes. 

 

Kentucky

Kentucky is very e-bike friendly. As long as the e-bike has operable pedals and is a Class 1, 2, or 3, e-bike, the bike may be taken on paths and sidewalks as well as bike lanes. No helmets are required for any age, but they are encouraged!

 

Louisiana

As long as it has a max speed of 25mph, Louisiana considers it a motorized bicycle. Riders under 12 may not operate class 3 bikes. All riders of class 3 e-bikes must wear a helmet. Class 1 e-bikes are allowed wherever traditional bikes are allowed, while classes 2 and 3 should check with the local agency. 

 

Maine

Class 3 e-bikes are the most heavily regulated in Maine and may not operate on bike paths or trails unless within and adjacent to a highway or roadway. No one under the age of 16 may operate a class 2 or 3 e-bike which is a bit stricter than most states. Check with the local regulations for your particular riding area. 

 

Maryland

Maryland governs e-bikes just like traditional bicycles, however, e-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks. Class 3 e-bikes are forbidden on most bike paths. Riders under 16 may not operate a class 3 e-bike.  

 

Massachusetts

The max speed for e-bikes in MA is 25mph. Riders must have a license to operate the e-bike and have it registered. They do not need to carry insurance. Helmets are required for all e-bike riders. Eight State Parks in MA allow motorized vehicles such as e-bikes on their trails. 

 

Michigan

Michigan allows Class 1 e-bikes on “improved surface” trails such as cement and rail trails where railways have been covered and turned into bike paths. There are no age restrictions in Michigan as of right now, but there are helmet restrictions for Class 3 e-bikes. Mackinac Island State Park requires a permit to use any e-bike, while no other park does provided the e-bike is only used on motorized-vehicle trails. 

 

Minnesota

Unlike cars, Minnesota does not require e-bikes to carry registration, insurance, or operator licenses. However, no one under the age of 15 can use an e-bike. Other than that, e-bikes are treated just like regular bicycles. 

 

Mississippi

Like most other states, Mississippi recognizes the three classes of e-bikes. Anyone under the age of 16 may not use class 3 e-bikes. Most paths are open to e-bikes, but as always, check with local rules before riding if you are unsure. 

 

Missouri

E-bikes in Missouri are classified just like regular bikes and are allowed on most bike paths and multi-use trails where traditional bikes are allowed. An age restriction is in place for riders under 16 banning their use of class 3 e-bikes. 

 

Montana

E-bikes up to 20 mph are allowed on sidewalks, bike lanes, trails, and paths. No helmets are required nor are there any age restrictions.

 

Nebraska

Just like Montana, Nebraska has a favorable e-bike policy. No helmets are required nor are there any age restrictions. The e-bike must have operable pedals, a < 750w motor, and a maximum speed of 20mph. 

 

Nevada

Nevada is another e-bike-friendly location to visit or live. All e-bikes are treated like traditional bikes and must follow all the same rules and laws. 

 

New Hampshire

In NH, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes with some exceptions. Class 3 e-bikes are only allowed on roads. Class 1 and 2 e-bikes can use bike trails and bike lanes where permitted. Classes 3 e-bikes also require a helmet if the rider is under 18 and in general, the rider must be 16 or older. 

 

New Jersey

E-bikes in New Jersey may ride on most bike paths and do not require registration, insurance, or a license. Bikes, in general, may not be ridden on the sidewalk in New Jersey anywhere, unless expressly allowed. 

 

New Mexico

New Mexico defines an e-bike as a moped. This means they need insurance, a license, and a minimum age of 15 to use them. E-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks and are motorized vehicles so are not allowed on most traditional bike paths. 

 

New York

New York classifies electric bikes as bicycles if they have an electric motor of fewer than 750 watts and fully functional pedals. As of April 2020, Class 3 e-bikes are prohibited. Class 1 and 2 e-bikes are subject to the same laws as traditional bikes including single file riding required and access to roads with 30mph speed limits or less. 

 

North Carolina

E-bikes must not exceed 20 mph in North Carolina. The motor must be under 750 watts and the rider must be 16 or older. Other than that, e-bikes are regulated much like traditional non-motorized bicycles unless a city has a local law about them. 

 

North Dakota

North Dakota treats e-bikes as traditional bikes using the 3-class system. If a rider is on a class 3 e-bike, they must wear a helmet under the age of 18. 

 

Ohio

Class 3 e-bike operators must wear a helmet in Ohio. E-bikes are allowed on most bike paths, except in Ohio State parks where e-bikes are forbidden on division trails. E-bikes do not require registration, licensing, or insurance in Ohio. 

 

Oklahoma

There are not many irregular restrictions on e-bikes in Oklahoma, however, class 3 e-bikes have some rules. Class 3 bikes are not allowed on most paths and riders must be 16 or older. As always, local cities can restrict the use of e-bikes if they have a specific law or ruling. 

Oregon

Oregon is a beautiful state to e-bike in (under 1000W motor required!). However, e-bikes are not allowed on any sidewalks and riders must be 16 or older. No helmets are required in Oregon. E-0bikes are not allowed on State trails except class 1 and 2 e-bikes on trails 8 feet wide or more for safety. 

 

Pennsylvania

E-bike riding in Pennsylvania is allowed with the following stipulations:

  • The rider is 16 years old or older.
  • The e-bike has operable pedals.
  • The e-bike has a motor at or under 750 watts.
  • The e-bike weighs less than 100lbs.
  • The e-bike has less than 4 wheels.
  • The bike stops providing power above 20mph.

Rhode Island

E-bikes are considered “motorized bicycles” in Rhode Island. They must have a motor under 1491watts and a max speed of 25mph. Anyone under 15 must wear a helmet. 

 

South Carolina

E-bikes in SC do not require a license or registration nor does SC State Parks Department have a policy for e-bikes at this time. Therefore, check with the local jurisdiction for updates and current laws. In general, e-bikes must follow the same rules of the road as all other bicycles. 

 

South Dakota

Like many states, South Dakota has the most regulations on class 3 e-bikes, while classes 1 and 2 are typically allowed on any bike path in the state. Class 3 e-bikes require the operator to be over 15 years old and are not allowed on bike paths or trails 

 

Tennessee

Tennessee does not allow e-bikes on sidewalks for safety reasons. Class 3 e-bikes must have a rider older than 13 years of age and a helmet on while riding. Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on most trails, but classes 1 and 2 e-bikes may be permitted on bike paths depending on the city. 

 

Texas

E-bikes are largely regulated like traditional bicycles and do not require permits or registration. Class 3 e-bikes may not be used by someone under 15 years of age.  

 

Utah

The only law of concern in the grand state of Utah is that e-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks. Very e-bike friendly as long as it falls into one of the 3 classes of e-bike. 

 

Vermont

There are not many restrictions on e-bikes in Vermont, however, class 3 e-bikes have extra rules. Class 3 bike riders must be 16 or older. E-bikes are usually allowed on multi-use paths and bike trails, no matter the class. 

 

Virginia

Where bicycles are permitted, e-bikes can take advantage of trails and paths as long as they are class 1 through 3 and the rider wears a helmet if on a class 3 bike. No license or registration is required in Virginia. 

 

Washington

The lovely northwest state of Washington allows class 1 and class 2 e-bikes on most trails. Operators must be 16 or older to use a class 3 e-bike, but even then, class 3 e-bikes are only allowed on roads and bike lanes and must follow the same rules of the road as vehicles and bicycles. 

 

Washington D.C.

In D.C., the combined speed of human power and bike power must not exceed 20mph. Riders must be at least 16 years old but do not require a license, registration, or insurance. 

 

West Virginia

WV designates class 1 and class 3 e-bikes but does not recognize class 2 e-bikes. All riders under 15 have to use a helmet. Class 1 e-bikes are available to use on most trails and paths. Class 3 e-bikes require the rider to be at least 16 years old.

 

Wisconsin

The main law to be aware of in Wisconsin for e-bikes is riders under 16 may not operate a class 3 e-bike. Otherwise, e-bikes are allowed in most areas except mountain bike trails on State land. 

 

Wyoming

The big state of Wyoming allows all classes of e-bikes on most trails unless otherwise noted. However, on Wyoming State land, only class 1 e-bikes are allowed on the trails for bikes. 

 

Thanks for checking out our list of e-bike laws by state! We do our best to stay informed on changes to local and state regulations, but because e-bikes are constantly changing, the laws are too. Please always check with your state or park rangers or local city guidance on where you can use your e-bike safely. 

 

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