E-Bike definitions & classifications by state


Alaska:  Alaska considers electric bicycles as a "motor-driven cycle" and requires a license and registration.
 
Alabama: Alabama uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Arkansas: Arkansas uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same manner as traditional bikes.
 
Arizona: Arizona adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
California: California adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bicycles.
 
Colorado: Colorado uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same way as traditional bicycles.
 
Connecticut: Connecticut uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same manner as traditional bikes.
 
Delaware: Delaware defines eBikes as a "bicycle" as long as the motor is under 750w and the bike has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Florida: Florida considers electric bikes to fall under the definition of a "bicycle" capable of being operated by human power.
 
Georgia: Georgia uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Hawaii: Hawaii classifies electric bikes as "low-speed electric bicycles" when used with a max speed of 20 mph.
 
Iowa: Iowa defines an electric bike as a "bicycle" as long as its motor is under 750w and the bike has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Idaho: Idaho uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Illinois: Illinois adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Indiana: Indiana uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Kansas: The state of Kansas defines an eBike as an "electric-assisted bicycle" as long as its motor is under 1000w and has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Kentucky: In Kentucky, an electric bicycle is considered a "bicycle" as long it has operable pedals.
 
Louisiana: An electric bicycle is considered a "motorized bicycle" in Louisiana as long as it reaches a maximum speed of 25 mph.
 
Massachusetts: The state of Massachusetts defines an eBike as a "motorized bicycle" as long as the bike does not exceed a maximum speed of 25 mph. Riders must carry a license and may be subject to registration requirements.
 
Maryland: Maryland uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Maine: Maine adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Michigan: Michigan regulates e-Bikes like traditional bicycles, and the three-tiered classification is used for electric bikes.
 
Minnesota: Minnesota defines eBikes as an "electric-assisted bicycle." Bikes in this category must be equipped with a motor under 1000w and a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Missouri: Missouri defines an electric bicycle as a "motorized bicycle" if it reaches a maximum speed of 30 mph.
 
Mississippi: Mississippi defines an electric bicycle as a "bicycle with a motor attached."
 
Montana: Montana defines an electric bicycle as an "electric-assisted bicycle." A bike can be placed in this category if it has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
North Carolina: North Carolina defines an e-bike as an "electric-assisted bicycle" if its motor is under 1000w and it has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
North Dakota: The state of North Dakota defines an e-bike as a "motorized bicycle." eBikes are subject to the same rules, licensing, registration, and insurance requirements as motor vehicles.
 
Nebraska: Nebraska defines eBikes as an "electric-assisted bicycle." Bikes in this category must have a motor under 750w, and a maximum speed of 20 mph, with pedals operated by human power.
 
New Hampshire: New Hampshire follows the three-tiered classification of electric bikes. E-Bikes are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
New Jersey: The NJ definition includes only the first two tiers of classifications used by other states. The legislature also defines "motorized bicycles" as a device that operates over 20 mph with a maximum motor-assisted speed of 28 miles per hour. This definition closely aligns with the Class 3 definition used in other states.
 
New Mexico: New Mexico defines an eBike as a "moped." They are subject to the same road rules, licensing, and insurance requirements applicable to motor vehicles.
 
Nevada: The state of Nevada defines an e-bike as an "electric bicycle." Bikes fall in this category when the motor is under 750w, with a maximum speed of 20 mph, and pedals operated by human power.
 
New York: New York state defines electric bikes as bicycles if they have an electric motor of less than 750w and have fully functional pedals.
 
Ohio: In Ohio, the three-tiered classification is used for electric bicycles, with E-Bikes regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Oklahoma: Oklahoma follows the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same way as traditional bicycles.
 
Oregon: Oregon defines an e-bike as an "electric-assisted bicycle" if the motor is under 1000w and the bike has a max speed of 20miles per hour.
 
Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania defines an electric bicycle as a "pedalcycle with electric assist." An eBikes falls in this category if the motor is under 750w. It must have operable pedals but a maximum speed of 20 mph when powered solely by the engine. Additionally, the bike must weigh no more than 100 pounds and follow the road's same rules as a traditional bicycle.
 
Rhode Island: Rhode Island defines e-bikes as "electric motorized bicycles." E-bikes must have fully operable pedals, a max power output of 1491w, and a top speed of 25 mph.
 
South Carolina: South Carolina currently has no specific classification for electric bikes. However, since e-bikes are vehicles, they should follow standard vehicle road rules.
 
South Dakota: In South Dakota, the three-tiered classification is used for electric bicycles, with E-Bikes regulated like traditional bicycles.
Tennessee: Tennessee uses the three-tiered classifications for electric bicycles. E-Bikes are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Texas: The state of Texas uses the three-tiered classification for electric bicycles, with E-Bikes regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Utah: In Utah, E-Bikes are regulated like traditional bicycles, and the three-tiered classification for electric bikes applies.
 
Virginia: E-bikes in Virginia are classified as "electric power-assisted bicycles" if they have a motor under 1000w and operable pedals. The max speed for all bicycles and eBikes is 25 mph.
 
Vermont: Vermont categorizes e-bikes as "motor-assisted bicycles." E-Bikes are subject to the same laws as traditional bicycles if they have fully operable pedals. The motor should have a max power output of 1000w and a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Washington: Washington state regulates eBikes like traditional bicycles, and the three-tiered classification is used for electric bikes.
 
Wisconsin: Wisconsin defines an e-bike as a "motor-bicycle" if the motor is under 750w and has a maximum speed of 20 mph. Wisconsin requires electric bikes to be registered, and riders must have a valid license.
 
West Virginia: West Virginia defines an electric bicycle as a "moped." E-Bikes must adhere to the exact licensing and insurance requirements that apply to motor vehicles.
 
Wyoming: In Wyoming, eBikes are regulated like traditional bicycles, and the state uses the three-tiered classification for electric bikes.